Sept. 27 – 30

On June 3, 2021, the federal government passed legislation to designate Sept. 30 as the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. The day is meant to provide an opportunity to recognize and commemorate the legacy of residential schools, and to honour survivors, their families and affected communities. 

Lethbridge College Indigenous Services will be hosting events from Sept. 27 to 29, providing our campus and community members a safe place to learn the truth about residential schools, to recognize what happened to those who were forced to attend them, and to identify how the generational trauma inflicted by the schools continue to shape our society today.

The college will be closed, with no work or classes on Sept. 30, giving our campus community the opportunity to spend the day in a way they deem appropriate. Community members are urged to take this time to reflect, learn and be available to attend community events in the spirit of truth and reconciliation.


On-going events

LC Gallery: Indigenous Artist Showcase
Location: Niitsitapi’ksimpstaan

Bronze statues – Artist: Mike Day Chief and Art Calling Last

 

Indigenous Services Display Open in Centre Core for the Week
Location: Centre Core
Time: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.    

Indigenous Services Info table in Centre Core with TRC booklets from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

 

Selling Orange Shirt Day – Every Child Matters Shirt
Location: LC Bookstore

100% of proceeds will be donated to the Sage Clan


 

Schedule of Events

Tuesday Sept. 28

Unveiling of Iissksiniip (Coming to Know and Learn) Coulee Walk
Location: Iissksiniip Coulee Walk Welcome Sign (West Coulees by Cullen Residence)
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Join Lethbridge College’s Indigenous Services Team for the unveiling of the Iissksiniip (Coming to Know and Learn) Coulee Walk. An interpretative self-guided walk to explore the traditional plants, their uses and traditional creation stories of the Siksikaitsitapi, the Blackfoot Confederacy.

  • opening introductions and welcome
  • Opening Prayer
  • welcome from Lethbridge College leadership
  • importance of the Niitsitapi Strategy’s Theme 4: Collective Environment
  • overview of Iissksiniip (Coming to Know and Learn) Coulee Walk
  • words from traditional blackfoot Plant Knowledge Keeper and Artist of Iissksiniip Coulee Walk
    Api’soomaahka (Running Coyote), William Singer III
  • unveiling Iissksiniip Coulee Walk Traditional Blackfoot Plant Self-Guided Tour
  • Honour Song

Guided tour of Traditional Iissksiniip (Coming to Know and Learn) Coulee Walk Api’soomaahka (Running Coyote), by William Singer III
Location: West Coulees
*Please meet at the Iissksiniip Coulee Walk Welcome Sign
Time: 1 – 3 p.m.

Lethbridge College students, staff and faculty are invited to join artist and curator Api’soomaahka (Running Coyote), William Singer III for a guided tour of the new exhibit.

Wednesday Sept. 29

National Day for Truth and Reconciliation Program
Location: E.C. Fredericks | Streamed live at lethbridgecollege.ca/everychildmatters
Time: 1 – 3 p.m.
*Please note this will be recorded and streamed live, and will be available at lethbridgecollege.ca/everychildmatters

The National Day for Truth and Reconciliation is meant to provide an opportunity to recognize and commemorate the legacy of residential schools, and to honour survivors, their families and affected communities. 

12:30 p.m. – E.C. Fredericks Doors Open

1 p.m. – Official Program: Importance of the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

  • opening introductions and welcome
  • moment of silence for all the children who never made it home
  • Opening Prayer and Honour Song
  • welcome from Lethbridge College leadership
  • words from Indigenous Services

1:30 p.m. – Keynote address by Wilton Littlechild

Wilton Littlechild, Ph.D., is a Cree chief, residential school survivor, and lawyer who has worked both nationally and internationally including with the United Nations to advance Indigenous rights and Treaties. He has also – through leadership with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission – raised awareness of former Canadian policies that decimated the livelihood and culture of Indigenous Canadians.

* See full biography below

Thursday Sept. 30 – National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

– College Closed –

Bios

Wilton Littlechild

Wilton Littlechild, Ph.D., is a Cree chief, residential school survivor, and lawyer who has worked both nationally and internationally including with the United Nations to advance Indigenous rights and Treaties. He has also – through leadership with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission – raised awareness of former Canadian policies that decimated the livelihood and culture of Indigenous Canadians.

Born in Alberta, Wilton Littlechild was raised largely at residential schools from 1951 to 1964, where he spent 14 years surviving through study and sport. After leaving residential school, he studied physical education at the University of Alberta and law at the University of New Mexico, where he continued his balance of academics and hockey.

Chief Littlechild was a member of the 1977 Indigenous delegation to the United Nations (UN) and worked on the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. He organized within the UN to increase Indigenous input in the economic and social issues the UN tackles. In the 1980s, he worked on the lawsuit to prevent patriation of the Canadian Constitution until the Aboriginal and Treaty Rights were protected and, in more recent years, has been a regional and International Chief on Treaties No. 6, 7, 8.

Chief Littlechild has been a member of parliament, Vice-President of the Indigenous Parliament of the Americas, North American representative to the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, and a chairperson for the UN Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the Commission on First Nations and Métis Peoples and Justice Reform.

In addition to his ongoing work with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, he’s continued to run his own law firm in Erminiskin Reserve, Alberta, and maintains his commitment to sport. He has been inducted into seven Sports Halls of Fame.

He has been awarded the Order of Canada and in 1993, the Canadian government awarded Chief Littlechild the Canada 125 Medal. He is a 2015 Laureate of the Indspire Awards and was recently honoured with the Alberta Award of Excellence.

William Singer III

Api’soomaahka (Running Coyote) William Singer III is a full-blooded member of the Blood Tribe/Kainai of the Blackfoot Confederacy. William is named after his great uncle Running Coyote, who was a Blackfoot warrior, and carries on his legacy by living in two worlds and maintaining the Blackfoot worldview by understanding the past to survive in the present. William’s main profession is as a professional artist/illustrator and has 35 years of experience. His work is deeply rooted in the Blackfoot culture and worldview and uses his painting to teach others. Along with his art, William divides his time as an entrepreneur and an environmental and political activist, utilizing Blackfoot traditional knowledge and protocol. Other areas of interest include Blackfoot history, watershed health, researching, communications and management/marketing consultation. He has been involved in many spiritual and cultural events and activities and has always been an advocate for First Nations rights and knowledge.